How to reduce bullying of your child at school by tutor, John Toker

Children with emotional disorders, ED often have three key overlapping characteristics over the course of months (Vaughn, & Bos 2007).

First ED trait: Relationships with are not sustained by such student (Vaughn, & Bos 2007).

Second ED trait: They argue and fight with students in class; this is part of externalizing behavior (Vaughn, & Bos 2007).

Third ED trait: Excessively withdraw on a social level on a chronic basis; internalizing behavior is indicative of such affect.

Tips for identifying ED that happens on numerous occasions over an extended number of school days: Behavior that is considered markedly immature for chronological age; for example, adolescents who cling on to their parents arms. When unprovoked engage in conflict while in class, in the school yard and often at home (Vaughn, & Bos 2007).

Student with ED often do the opposite in other cases; they excessively withdraw with little or no reason during the teachers lessons and then not meet basic social expectations in the school yard or cafeteria as well; for example, Jill is directed by her teacher to speak more softly because she is being a little too loud. In turn, Jill refuses to speak with her teacher or peers.

Journal about students frequency, duration, and intensity of behavior whom reflects ED characteristics. Teachers should note settings in which such actions take place. Be detail oriented while documenting pupils actions or affect.

 

Keep track of relevant information given by parents about students at issue.

Compare your observations as the teacher with other teachers, include samples of learners’ class work in a multitude of subjects and settings (Vaughn, & Bos 2007).

Classroom setting when teaching children with ED; three tips: Tier 1, Rules classroom must be clearly defined as should consequence of breaking them; research based broad spectrum strategies must be central for management and screening of them.

Tier 2, Students with ED challenges are put into small groups as it is conducive to teachers guiding them to self-monitor, self-control, and socializing. Give points or treats to pupils who meet your rules and complete assignments, which is the check-in, check-out (CICO) procedure.

Tier 3, Include a comprehensive team, including parents, colleague teachers, school psychotherapists, and any other professionals at the school who are willing to collectively develop consistent behavioral modification steps and techniques.

 

 

 

 

 
References

Vaughn, S., & Bos, C. (2007). Response to Intervention: Developing Success for All Learners. In Teaching students who are exceptional, diverse, and at risk in the general education classroom (4th ed., p. 209 to 214). Boston: Pearson Allyn & Bacon.

Vaughn, S., & Bos, C. (2007). Response to Intervention: Developing Success for All Learners. In Teaching students who are exceptional, diverse, and at risk in the general education classroom (4th ed., p. 207 to 215). Boston: Pearson Allyn & Bacon.

Vaughn, S., & Bos, C. (2007). Response to Intervention: Developing Success for All Learners. In Teaching students who are exceptional, diverse, and at risk in the general education classroom (4th ed., p. 217 to 223). Boston: Pearson Allyn & Bacon.

Vaughn, S., & Bos, C. (2007). Response to Intervention: Developing Success for All Learners. In Teaching students who are exceptional, diverse, and at risk in the general education classroom (4th ed., p. 218 to 234). Boston: Pearson Allyn & Bacon.

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