Making school go easier for students with ADHD by tutor, John Toker

ADHD interferes with a person’s ability to focus and organize in order to complete tasks.

 

School related issues of ADHD include inattentiveness to classroom taught material and disorganization about what and how to do homework assignments. Consequently, your child’s grades are low, and he or she suffers from low self-esteem.

child, so that it is fresh in your mind.

 

2. Perfection is the enemy of the good, which is a classic expression that means, in this case, if your child has completed his or her homework, and put away the toys, consider it successful evening. Being angry with your child because the one other task was still not done, will leave you continuously annoyed by your son or daughter. While on a walk by yourself, reflect in this non-confrontational setting what makes you, if it applies, a perfectionist, and realize that this is not your child’s issue.

 

3. Trust that through maturity of your son or daughter and steps you and the teacher take to help your child, in time, ADHD issues will reduce or become more manageable. While working with your child focus on the process of doing the best you can as a parent, rather than the end goals that may well take years to achieve.

 

4. Join a support group that has parents coping with their children’s ADHD as its focus; you will gain new coping strategies and share your own with others in the group. Set aside a time, each week, to attend a setting that allows you to be your best self with your child and hear feedback from people who are able to have a level of objectivity that is often difficult to have as the parent.

 

5. Friends and family can often give you a break from looking after your child; this can give you a chance to regroup your best coping strategies in caring for your

 

5 strategies for parents to assist their children in coping with ADHD

 

1. Do not take your child’s lack of focus to your instructions and lack of organization personally; remember your child is doing this because of his or ADHD, rather than trying to make you angry. Remind yourself of this walking into your home just before seeing your

child, so that it is fresh in your mind.

 

2. Perfection is the enemy of the good, which is a classic expression that means, in this case, if your child has completed his or her homework, and put away the toys, consider it successful evening. Being angry with your child because the one other task was still not done, will leave you continuously annoyed by your son or daughter. While on a walk by yourself, reflect in this non-confrontational setting what makes you, if it applies, a perfectionist, and realize that this is not your child’s issue.

 

3. Trust that through maturity of your son or daughter and steps you and the teacher take to help your child, in time, ADHD issues will reduce or become more manageable. While working with your child focus on the process of doing the best you can as a parent, rather than the end goals that may well take years to achieve.

 

4. Join a support group that has parents coping with their children’s ADHD as its focus; you will gain new coping strategies and share your own with others in the group. Set aside a time, each week, to attend a setting that allows you to be your best self with your child and hear feedback from people who are able to have a level of objectivity that is often difficult to have as the parent.

 

5. Friends and family can often give you a break from looking after your child; this can give you a chance to regroup your best coping strategies in caring for your child with ADHD issues. Find people who are flexible with short notice to take over supervision of your child. Support may not have time or energy for regularly watching your son or daughter for hours every week. Albeit, they may well be available for a few hours a  month when you most need it.

 

Resources:

 http://www.chadd.org

http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/985.html

 

http://www.empoweringparents.com/reduce-homework-hassles-with-simple-tips.php

 

References

 

ADD/ADHD Parenting Tips. (2015, June 1). Retrieved July 12, 2015.

 

http://www.learndifferentlytutor.com/

http://www.johntoker.com/

 

 

 

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